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Kevin Conger

Posted by on Jan 20 2016 | 2013, Architecture, Fellows, Grantees by Category

Better Market Street _Kevin Conger WEB

Kevin Conger
2013 Fellow

Kevin Conger is the President and CEO of CMG Landscape Architecture, as well as a founding partner of this San Francisco-based studio. He has developed many projects to benefit the Bay Area’s design community, including Better Market Street, the Yerba Buena Street Life Plan, redevelopment plans for Hunters Point and Treasure Island. These projects seek to create sustainable accessibility, natural vistas and green design elements to benefit the Bay Area community as a whole.

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Dr. Timothy Beatley

Posted by on Jan 20 2016 | 2013, Architecture, Fellows, Grantees by Category

beatley_tree_200dpi (1) WEB WIDE

Dr. Timothy Beatley
2013 Fellow

Dr. Timothy Beatley is an internationally recognized author, sustainable city researcher and Professor at the University of Virginia’s School of Architecture. The author of more than fifteen books including Biophilic Cities: Integrating Nature into Urban Design and Planning, Native to nowhere: sustaining home and community in a global age and Green urbanism: learning from European cities, Beatley’s primary subject is that of sustainable communities.

Beatley believes that sustainable and resilient cities represent our best hope for addressing today’s environmental challenges, and he focuses on strategies for reducing the ecological footprints of towns and cities, while simultaneously becoming more livable and equitable places.

One of Beatley’s main concepts is that of Green Urbanism. Cities that exemplify green urbanism strive to live within its ecological limits. They are designed to function in ways analogous to nature and attempt to be locally and regionally self-sufficient. An additional benefit of Green Urbanism is the facilitation of more sustainable lifestyles and its emphasis on a high quality of neighborhood and community life.

tim.greenurbanvision.com

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Jennifer Wolch

Posted by on Jul 26 2012 | 2012, Ecology, Education, Fellows, Grantees by Category, Grantees by Year

Jennifer Wolch
2012 Fellow

The challenges of building healthier and more sustainable cities motivate the research of Jennifer Wolch, UC Berkeley College of Environmental Design (CED). Before coming to UC Berkeley to serve as CED’s first woman dean, Wolch directed the Center for Sustainable Cities at the University of Southern California, where she conducted research on urban sprawl, metropolitan planning, and access to parks and open space. Her work done in collaboration with colleagues, students, and community-based organizations, included investigations into urban homelessness; formulating alternatives to sprawl; analyses of park and recreational resource access and environmental justice; development of web-based geospatial planning tools for watershed health, habitat conservation, and park space projects; assessments of urban alleys as potential green infrastructure; and studies of how urban design influences physical activity and public health.

In the Bay Area, Wolch continues to work on issues of how to utilize remnant urban land as green infrastructure and how park-adjacent traffic crashes and air pollution deepen environmental justice issues associated with parks and open space. She has also initiated investigations into issues of park access and urban ecology in Chinese cities.

ced.berkeley.edu/ced/people

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Michael Swaine

Posted by on Jul 20 2012 | 2012, Art, Fellows, Grantees by Category, Grantees by Type, Grantees by Year

Michael Swaine
2012 Fellow

Michael Swaine is an inventor and designer working in many media. His work is collaborative in nature and has been included in exhibitions at the Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum, New York; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the San Francisco Museum of Craft and Folk Art; and the Exploratorium, San Francisco.

He is currently building the Free Mending Library in the Tenderloin area of San Francisco.  It is a library for fixing the holes in our lives—a place to borrow thread and sewing machines and talk about life.  He has been sewing, hemming and mending for free in the Tenderloin on the 15th of every month since 2001 – the year of his Generosity Project for the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts.

Swaine teaches at California College of the Arts, Mills College and the San Francisco Art Institute.

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Megan and Rick Prelinger

Posted by on May 31 2012 | 2012, Education, Fellows, Grantees by Year

Megan & Rick Prelinger
2012 Fellows

The Prelinger Library is a private research library open to the public co-founded by Megan and Rick Prelinger. It houses more than forty thousand books and other print artifacts on North American technology, regional & land use history, media & cultural studies, including a space history collection.

Megan Prelinger is an independent historian and a lifelong collector of space history ephemera and science fiction literature.

Rick Prelinger is an archivist, writer and filmmaker. He also founded Prelinger Archives, whose collection of 51,000 advertising, educational, industrial, and amateur films was acquired by the Library of Congress in 2002. Rick has partnered with the Internet Archive to make 2,000 films from Prelinger Archives available online for free viewing, downloading and reuse.

prelingerlibrary.org

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Jeff Mapes

Posted by on May 31 2011 | 2011, Ecology, Education, Fellows, Grantees by Year

Jeff Mapes
2011 Fellow

Jeff Mapes is the author of Pedaling Revolution: How Cyclists are Changing American Cities (Oregon State University Press, 2009) which describes the growing urban bike culture that is changing the look and feel of U.S. cities.

Mapes, a seasoned political journalist and long-time bike commuter, explores the growth of bicycle advocacy while covering such issues as the environmental, safety, and health aspects of bicycling for short urban trips. Chapters set in Chicago and Portland show how bicycling has became a political act, with seemingly dozens of subcultures, and how cyclists – with the encouragement of local officials – are seizing streets back from motorists. Bike activists are creating the future of how we travel and live in twenty-first-century cities.

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David Gissen

Posted by on May 31 2011 | 2011, Architecture, Fellows, Grantees by Year

David Gissen
2011 Fellow

David Gissen is an historian and theorist of architecture and urbanism. His recent work focuses on developing a novel concept of nature in architectural thought and developing experimental forms of architectural historical practice.

Gissen is the author of the book Subnature: Architecture’s Other Environments (Princeton Architectural Press, 2009), editor of the “Territory” issue of AD Journal (2010), and editor of the book Big and Green (Princeton Architectural Press, 2003). He recently completed the manuscript “Manhattmospheres” an environmental and architectural history of New York City in the 1970s.

htcexperiments.org

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Rosten Woo

Posted by on May 31 2011 | 2011, Architecture, Art, Fellows, Grantees by Year

Rosten Woo
2011 Fellow

Rosten Woo is an artist, designer and writer living in Los Angeles. He makes work that helps people understand complex systems and participate in group decision-making. His work has been exhibited at the Cooper-Hewitt Design Triennial, the New Museum, the Venice Architecture Biennale, Netherlands Architectural Institute, the Lower East Side Tenement Museum; and in various public housing developments, tugboats, shopping malls and parks in New York City and Los Angeles. His first book, Street Valuewas published by Princeton Architectural Press in 2010.

He is co-founder and former executive director of the Center for Urban Pedagogy (CUP), a nonprofit organization that uses design and art to improve civic engagement. CUP projects demystify the urban policy and planning issues that impact communities so that more individuals can better participate in shaping them.

wehavenoart.net

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Amber Hasselbring

Posted by on May 31 2011 | 2011, Art, Ecology, Fellows, Grantees by Year

Amber Hasselbring
2011 Fellow

Amber Hasselbring is a San Francisco artist focused on exploring ecological relationships. Since 2004, she has produced collaborative, project-based works that involve participation by invited and circumstantial audiences. Hasselbring’s Mission Greenbelt Project (2007-present) explores themes of gentrification, education and urban ecology through performances and garden building efforts in San Francisco.  The project is an ongoing urban earthwork of sidewalk gardens, planted with California native and other drought-tolerant plants. The gardens attract wildlife, relieve the city’s overburdened water treatment system and encourage volunteerism and cooperation. The proposed route connects Mission District parks and open spaces.

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Sandor Katz

Posted by on May 31 2011 | 2011, Ecology, Education, Fellows, Grantees by Year

Sandor Katz
2011 Fellow

Sandor Katz is the author of The Revolution Will Not be Microwaved: Inside America’s Underground Food Movements (Chelsea Green Publishing, 2006) This book is about food activism and people trying to make better choices – people wanting to create better food alternatives for themselves and the people in the communities around them.Katz urges people to challenge their roles as unquestioning consumers of the American food industry. His message is to use everyday ingredients to be a producer and not just consumer of food – and not just ordinary food – but some of the most vibrantly flavorful and health giving foods imaginable. His critique of mega production and celebration of the alternatives empowers people to feel like they can make and cultivate their own food – whatever their circumstances. His long held belief in community gardens, community supported agriculture and community kitchens has inspired many and been an integral part in the underground food movement.

Katz is also the author of The Art of Fermentation: An In-depth Exploration of Essential Concepts and Processes from Around the World (Chelsea Green Publishing, 2012) and Wild Fermentation: The Flavor, Nutrition, and Craft of Live-Culture Foods (Chelsea Green Publishing, 2003). He travels widely teaching people simple fermentation techniques and demystify home fermentation. He has taught hundreds of hands-on fermentation workshops around the US and Australia.

wildfermentation.com

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