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Archive for the '2013' Category

Kevin Conger

Posted by on Jan 20 2016 | 2013, Architecture, Fellows, Grantees by Category

Better Market Street _Kevin Conger WEB

Kevin Conger
2013 Fellow

Kevin Conger is the President and CEO of CMG Landscape Architecture, as well as a founding partner of this San Francisco-based studio. He has developed many projects to benefit the Bay Area’s design community, including Better Market Street, the Yerba Buena Street Life Plan, redevelopment plans for Hunters Point and Treasure Island. These projects seek to create sustainable accessibility, natural vistas and green design elements to benefit the Bay Area community as a whole.

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Dr. Timothy Beatley

Posted by on Jan 20 2016 | 2013, Architecture, Fellows, Grantees by Category

beatley_tree_200dpi (1) WEB WIDE

Dr. Timothy Beatley
2013 Fellow

Dr. Timothy Beatley is an internationally recognized author, sustainable city researcher and Professor at the University of Virginia’s School of Architecture. The author of more than fifteen books including Biophilic Cities: Integrating Nature into Urban Design and Planning, Native to nowhere: sustaining home and community in a global age and Green urbanism: learning from European cities, Beatley’s primary subject is that of sustainable communities.

Beatley believes that sustainable and resilient cities represent our best hope for addressing today’s environmental challenges, and he focuses on strategies for reducing the ecological footprints of towns and cities, while simultaneously becoming more livable and equitable places.

One of Beatley’s main concepts is that of Green Urbanism. Cities that exemplify green urbanism strive to live within its ecological limits. They are designed to function in ways analogous to nature and attempt to be locally and regionally self-sufficient. An additional benefit of Green Urbanism is the facilitation of more sustainable lifestyles and its emphasis on a high quality of neighborhood and community life.

tim.greenurbanvision.com

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Youth Art Exchange

Posted by on Jul 07 2014 | 2013, Art, Education, Grantees, Grantees by Type

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Youth Art Exchange
2013 – $5,000 Mobile Parklet

Founded in 2000, Youth Art Exchange provides relevant arts education that connects underserved high school-aged youth to the broader community. Based at the intersection of the Oceanview-Merced-Ingleside neighborhood and Excelsior, Youth Art Exchange fills the gap of services for youth in this low-income, multi-lingual neighborhood.

Mobile Parklet
A youth-designed and built parklet in San Francisco’s Oceanview-Merced-Ingleside neighborhood offers a green gathering space in front of the centrally located Fog Lifter Café on Ocean Avenue, improving public life by keeping this commercial corridor accessible and exciting for urban dwellers and visitors.

youthartexchange.org

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Tenderloin Neighborhood Development Corporation

Posted by on Jul 07 2014 | 2013, Architecture, Grantees

Tenderloin Vertical Garden

Tenderloin Neighborhood Development Corporation
2013 – $8,000 Tenderloin Vertical Garden

Tenderloin Vertical Garden
The Tenderloin Vertical Garden is a project of the TNDC (Tenderloin Neighborhood Development Corporation) People’s Garden. The garden was established after a 2009 TNDC residents’ summit yielded survey data demonstrating that access to fresh, healthy food was the top concern of Tenderloin residents. On just 2,500 sq ft, our gardeners produced and distributed over 3,000 pounds of produce for the community last year, all given away for free.  The Vertical Garden structure includes a wood structure supporting Woolly Pocket planters for edible plants, a long wood planter with plants to attract pollinators, and an automated drip irrigation system. Community members, horticulturalists, and designers gave input to the structure during two open community design meetings. Signage added will provide information and showcase the gardens.

tndc.org

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SF Environment

Posted by on Jul 07 2014 | 2013, 2014, Architecture, Ecology, Grantees, Grantees by Type

sf environment

SF Environment
2014 – $10,000 Biodiversity Program
2013 – $10,000 Biodiversity Program

Under the San Francisco Department of the Environment, a Biodiversity Program, led by biodiversity coordinator Peter Brastow, creates programs, plans and strategies for the management and stewardship of San Francisco wildlands, biodiversity and public biodiversity education.

The Biodiversity Program will create a Strategic Biodiversity Action Plan, with a blueprint for the program and San Francisco. It will also create the infrastructure to act as the hub for biodiversity planning, policy-making, coordination and education city-wide.

sfenvironment.org/buildings-environments/natural-san-francisco/the-biodiversity-program

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Tigers on Market Street

Posted by on Mar 20 2014 | 2013, 2014, Grantees, Grantees by Category, Grantees by Year

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Tigers on Market Street
2014 – $5,000 General Support
2013 – $3,000 Habitat Research

The Western Tiger Swallowtail butterfly (Papilio rutulus) has found a home on San Francisco’s Market Street; it lives a complete life cycle in the London Plane trees that line the busy thoroughfare. The canyon of tall buildings lined with trees resemble the butterfly’s natural habitat – river canyons. This project engages the public in this unique butterfly phenomenon, create methods for creative interactions, and connects people to wildlife in one of the densest urban areas.

The Western Tiger Swallowtail butterfly habitat will be incorporated into the new design for Market Street, aligning the San Francisco Department of Public Works, the San Francisco Planning Department and the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission to support this vital habitat.

Tigers on Market’s will use data gathered in their 2013 fieldwork to produce a graphic poster and field guide as a takeaway for those interested in learning more about wildlife living in the downtown and an educational tool for schools in the greater downtown area.

natureinthecity.org/tigers

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San Francisco Before (SFB4)

Posted by on Mar 20 2014 | 2013, 2014, Grantees, Grantees by Category

SFB4

SFB4
2014 – $10,000 SFB4
2013 – $15,000 SFB4

San Francisco Before (SFB4)  investigates and describes the extraordinary landscape ecology of San Francisco at the time that Gasper de Portolá’s expedition laid their eyes on the bay in 1769. Through a block-by-block understanding of past landscape conditions, one will see the “ecological fundamentals” still shaping the urban landscape.  It’s goal is to suffuse the imaginations of San Franciscans with a vision of ecology so rich and compelling that it shifts perspectives for centuries to come and creates a template for sustainability suited to the particular geographic circumstances of San Francisco—using history to reveal, discover, and re-imagine.

On the project is Robin Grossinger, Senior Scientist at the San Francisco Estuary Institute (SFEI). He was named an Environmental Hero by Bay Nature Magazine and received the 2014 Carla Bard Bay Education Award from the Bay Institute. He has been featured nationally on NPR for his work on the historical ecology of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and is the author of the Napa Valley Historical Ecology Atlas (University of California Press 2012).

Robin is joined by Eric Sanderson, Ph.D., a Senior Conservation Ecologist at WCS and the author of the bestselling book, Mannahatta: A Natural History of New York City (Abrams, 2009). He is internationally known for his work in wildlife and landscape conservation and imagining cities in the past, present, and future. His work has been featured in National Geographic Magazine, The New Yorker, the New York Times, and elsewhere.

wcs.org

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Walk San Francisco

Posted by on Jun 13 2012 | 2012, 2013, 2014, 2016, Architecture, Ecology, Grantees, Grantees by Category, Grantees by Year

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Walk San Francisco
2016 – $10,000 Green Connections
2014 – $10,000 Vision Zero
2013 – $10,000 General Support
2012 – $6,000 General Support

Walk San Francisco speaks up for safer, more pleasant streets for everyone to walk on. Walk SF and its members are reclaiming San Francisco streets as shared public space to enjoy – through education and policy advocacy – working with elected leaders, city agencies and residents.

In 2012, Walk SF’s winning school zone campaign made San Francisco the first big city in California to create 15-mile-per-hour school zones citywide, making streets safer in neighborhoods around 180 schools. Walk SF is also working on a Pedestrian Action Plan to reduce pedestrian injuries and increase walking and a network of “Green Connections” to enable more residents to walk easily to parks and open space.

Green Connections
Walk SF strives to redefine streets as safe, shared public spaces for civic life, as opposed to speedways for cars. Green Connections are streets that connect people to parks, open space, and the waterfront throughout San Francisco. This planned 115-mile, 24-route network will encourage more people to get outside on foot by transforming ordinary streets into safe, inviting places for people and nature. Traffic calming and traffic diverters will increase walkability; low-impact development for stormwater management and plants will attract and support the area’s biodiversity; community members will be invited to bring art to the streets.

Walk to Work Day
WalkSF will add a physical presence in the City, with hubs where people can meet, a media event, and more. This is an excellent way to build the voice for better walking in the city, as people are encouraged to note what they see on their commute – what works and what doesn’t, what’s attractive, what’s dangerous – creating new advocates with every step.

Vision Zero
In 2014, WalkSF is building on the momentum of the Pedestrian Strategy combined with a recent spike in pedestrian injuries and fatalities through Vision Zero—Zero traffic fatalities in 10 years. Under Vision Zero, no loss of life on city roadways is acceptable, due to the preventable nature of these tragedies. Vision Zero was launched and proven doable by Sweden, and in recent years, both Chicago and New York City followed suit.

Through proven strategies, Walk San Francisco will engage community partners and the City to adopt and implement “the 5 E’s”—engineering safer streets, enforcing the most dangerous driving behaviors, educating drivers on how to prevent collisions, evaluating progress to modify efforts when needed, and engaging communities—to fulfill the Vision Zero goal. Together, these 5 E’s can shift the current paradigm from one where traffic collisions as perceived as “accidents,” to one where all roadway users respect one another and co-exist on a safe roadway network.

walksf.org

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Island Press

Posted by on May 25 2011 | 2011, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, Ecology, Education, Grantees, Grantees by Category, Grantees by Year

Island Press
2020 – $15,000 Online Programming During COVID-19 Pandemic
2020 – $25,000 Founders’ Pot
2019 – $25,000 General Support
2018 – $5,000 Founders’ Pot for General Operating Support
2017 – $5,000 Founders’ Pot for General Operating Support
2017 – $5,000 General Support
2016 – $5,000 General Support
2015 – $5,000 General Support
2014 – $5,000 General Support
2013 – $10,000 Sustainability Knowledge Network
2011 – $5,000 General Support

Since 1984, Island Press has been a trusted source of environmental information and solutions. They publish the best new ideas about how to protect the environment and work tirelessly to spread those ideas to help people make a positive difference in the world. Each year, Island Press publishes 40 new books on vital topics such as conservation biology, marine science, land conservation, green building, sustainable agriculture, climate change, and ecological restoration.Island Press authors and experts inform and inspire change by reaching out to millions of people through the press, online, in the classroom and in person. They host conferences, teach courses, and speak in the community on relevant environmental issues.

Sustainability Knowledge Network
Island Press’ Sustainability Knowledge Network gives targeted audiences of local stakeholders direct access to Island Press authors and other experts to foster better decision making and accelerate changes in policy and practice toward a future that is sustainable and resilient in the face of climate change. This strong, multidisciplinary network inspires local actions and fosters learning and collaboration.  Exposing local thought leaders to the ideas and knowledge captured in Island Press books provides fertile ground for advancing science- and evidence-based decision-making and accelerate the progress of climate mitigation and adaptation efforts, sustainability in cities, and improving communications about other major issues. The primary audiences are policymakers, practitioners, academics, private sector, media, and the general public. Island Press  cross-pollinates ideas from around the globe with these groups so that people can implement and adapt them locally.

islandpress.org

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Alliance for Biking and Walking

Posted by on May 25 2011 | 2011, 2013, Architecture, Ecology, Grantees, Grantees by Category, Grantees by Year

Alliance for Biking and Walking
2013 – $8,000 Open Streets
2011 – $5,000 General Support

The Alliance for Biking & Walking creates, strengthens, and unites state and local bicycle and pedestrian advocacy organizations in every state, province, and major city in North America. These sustainable organizations are highly respected by the public, media, and policy makers. Their efforts in communities and their united strength at the national level have transformed cities into places where it is easy, safe, desirable and common for citizens to bike and walk.

Open Streets
Open Streets develops a curriculum for a comprehensive three-day open streets training for cities interested in starting or growing initiatives. Open streets (commonly called Ciclovías, Saturday Parkways, Sunday Streets, etc.) differentiate themselves from block parties and street fairs by promoting active living, healthy lifestyle choices and connecting neighborhoods. They are typically part of a broader effort to encourage sustained physical activity, redefine public spaces and increase healthy transportation options. By opening the streets to people, residents view and connect with the community in a whole new way. An exercise in community building and social engagement, open streets also provide free recreational opportunities and public space where people can meet, socialize and make new friends.

peoplepoweredmovement.org

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