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Archive for the '2011' Category

San Francisco Nature Education

Posted by on May 25 2011 | 2011, Ecology, Education, Grantees, Grantees by Category, Grantees by Type, Grantees by Year

San Francisco Nature Education
2011 – $5,000 General Support

San Francisco Nature Education (SFNE) is now in its eleventh year of providing meaningful environmental education to students from under served schools. SFNE’s school program is focused on k-3rd grade students throughout schools in San Francisco and  introduces students at a very young age to basic concepts: respect for nature, conservation and stewardship.

SFNE’s trained volunteer naturalists visit classrooms and conduct field trips to local parks and also provided much needed mentoring to students in small groups. SFNE prides itself on maintaining a ratio of one to six students in the classroom and field. SFNE received the Jefferson Award for Public Service in 2005 and its’ director was nominated for the 2011 Terwilliger Environmental Award.

sfnature.org

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Produce to the People

Posted by on May 25 2011 | 2011, Ecology, Education, Grantees, Grantees by Year

Produce to the People
2011 – $3,000 General Support

Produce to the People (PttP) is a grassroots, community food organization in San Francisco, founded in June 2009.  PttP aims to localize the food system by utilizing and celebrating the unused resources in San Francisco, including fruit trees, vacant lots, and people power.

PttP’s work is rooted in outreach to under served communities, providing healthy, organic, local food for people who may not always have access to it, supporting garden projects in communities that may not have the funds to create or sustain them on their own, and providing educational jobs to youth with barriers to employment. They work to link these elements together; the growth, harvest, and dispersal of food, in conjunction with the collaboration of other organizations, neighbors, patrons of food programs, and young people, creates a full circle that links people coming from diverse life experiences and unites them over a common need for healthy food and community based care for one another.

producetothepeople.org

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Streetsblog

Posted by on May 25 2011 | 2011, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, Architecture, Ecology, Grantees, Grantees by Category, Grantees by Year

Streetsblog
2019 – $10,000 General Support
2018 – $8,000 General Support
2017 – $8,000 General Support
2017 – $8,000 General Support
2016 – $8,000 General Support
2011 – $8,000 General Support

Streetsblog is a non-profit daily news source, online community and political mobilizer for the Bay Area’s Livable Streets movement. Streetsblog frames the public debate on transportation and planning issues, creating momentum for more sustainable streets. A team of local writers collaborates with writers throughout California and Nationally to provide full coverage of transportation reform, urban planning and the Livable Streets movement locally and nationwide.

Streetsblog began in 2006 as a single local blog covering transportation and land use issues in New York City. The experiment proved a dramatic success, and it showcased the potential for focused advocacy journalism to empower overlooked constituencies and to usher in a reform-minded transportation policy agenda – SF.Streetsblog was launched in January 2009. The blog quickly became an influential voice and a mobilizer for the local transportation reform movement. Today, it reaches nearly 70,000 direct monthly readers, and plays a key role in the Bay Area’s Livable Streets movement. Their work is published on SF Gate and Bay Citizen. Streetsblog’s drumbeat of pedestrian, bicycle and transit stories have helped keep these important issues on the radar of supervisors and policy makers at City Hall and the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency.

sf.streetsblog.org

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The Bike Kitchen

Posted by on May 25 2011 | 2011, Ecology, Grantees, Grantees by Category, Grantees by Year

The Bike Kitchen
2011 – $3,000 General Support

San Francisco’s Bike Kitchen teaches people of all ages and backgrounds how to repair bicycles. Through bike repair and bicycle related projects, the Bike Kitchen promotes personal development and provides leadership opportunities. Operating as a cooperative shop, they provide affordable ways to acquire and maintain a bike, offer youth programs, encourage re-use and recycling, and work with community groups to get more people on bicycles. The Bike Kitchen is a 501(c)(3) non-profit run by volunteers.

bikekitchen.org

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Alliance for Biking and Walking

Posted by on May 25 2011 | 2011, 2013, Architecture, Ecology, Grantees, Grantees by Category, Grantees by Year

Alliance for Biking and Walking
2013 – $8,000 Open Streets
2011 – $5,000 General Support

The Alliance for Biking & Walking creates, strengthens, and unites state and local bicycle and pedestrian advocacy organizations in every state, province, and major city in North America. These sustainable organizations are highly respected by the public, media, and policy makers. Their efforts in communities and their united strength at the national level have transformed cities into places where it is easy, safe, desirable and common for citizens to bike and walk.

Open Streets
Open Streets develops a curriculum for a comprehensive three-day open streets training for cities interested in starting or growing initiatives. Open streets (commonly called Ciclovías, Saturday Parkways, Sunday Streets, etc.) differentiate themselves from block parties and street fairs by promoting active living, healthy lifestyle choices and connecting neighborhoods. They are typically part of a broader effort to encourage sustained physical activity, redefine public spaces and increase healthy transportation options. By opening the streets to people, residents view and connect with the community in a whole new way. An exercise in community building and social engagement, open streets also provide free recreational opportunities and public space where people can meet, socialize and make new friends.

peoplepoweredmovement.org

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Transportation Alternatives

Posted by on May 25 2011 | 2011, Architecture, Grantees, Grantees by Year

Transportation Alternatives
2011 – $5,000 General Support

Transportation Alternatives (TA) works to reclaim New York City’s streets from the automobile and to advocate for better walking, biking, and public transit for all New Yorkers. Through grassroots organizing and strategic communication campaigns, TA advances infrastructure and policy improvements that prioritize people, create safer streets, and ultimately realize a more accessible, sustainable, and equitable city. TA engages thousands of stakeholders each year through its advocacy work, including community residents, peer nonprofit organizations, civic coalitions, business leaders, elected local and state officials, and government agencies. Their campaigns reshape streetscapes into safe places where people can walk, bike, meet, play, and participate in the variety of activities that make urban living healthy, vibrant, and dynamic.

In the past five decades, TA has made remarkable progress. Today, bike lanes ribbon up and down Manhattan avenues. Hundreds of thousands more ride a bike to work every day. The city is equipped with dedicated bus lanes, public bike share, and car-free park spaces that did not exist five decades ago. In just the last two decades, TA advocacy was responsible for the introduction of America’s first protected bike lanes and the world’s largest speed camera program.  TA lowered the citywide speed limit for the first time in 50 years, and introduced Vision Zero to New York City, an idea which then spread across the U.S. The same story is true of the federal Safe Routes to Schools and Safe Routes for Seniors programs.

The few who founded Transportation Alternatives recruited and multiplied, and now TA’s tent of supporters is packed with New Yorkers who regularly take action, make the case to public officials, and testify to the importance of TA’s mission. Each week, TA organizes local meetings, protests, rallies, petition drives, community gatherings and on-street actions to amplify voices. By the power of these people and a track record of transformative change, TA demands New York City’s most influential decision makers pay attention.

In that time, a remarkable subset of the organization was also born. Families for Safe Streets (FSS) is a coalition of people injured in traffic crashes, and the children, spouses, siblings, and parents whose loved ones have been killed. What began in 2014 as a small group of families in mourning has grown to a citywide force for change, and a national inspiration, with chapter organizations in 14 cities. Together, this powerful group of survivors tell their stories as an unignorable testament to the need for safe streets and refuse to give an inch in defense of the status quo.

From the creation of grand public spaces, like the pedestrianization of Times Square, to the construction of protected bike lanes and pedestrian plazas in all five boroughs, TA and FSS have paved the way for remarkable changes in New York City’s transportation infrastructure and transformed New Yorkers’ understanding of bicycling, walking and public transit.

transalt.org

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Exploratorium

Posted by on May 25 2011 | 2011, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, Art, Ecology, Education, Grantees, Grantees by Category, Grantees by Year

exploratorium

Exploratorium
2019 – $10,000 Coastal Resiliency Collaboration
2019 – $10,000 General Support
2018 – $10,000 Urban Fellowship
2017 – $10,000 Urban Fellowship
2017 – $10,000 Habitat: Bay As It Is Symposium
2016 – $5,000 Habitat: Bay As It Is Symposium
2016 – $10,000 Urban Fellowship
2015 – $10,000 Urban Fellowship
2015 – $10,000 Center for Art and Inquiry
2014 – $10,000 Urban Fellowship
2013 – $10,000 Jane Wolf, Bay Lexicon
2013 – $1,000 Living Innovation Zone
2011 – $10,000 Capital Campaign

The Exploratorium is a San Francisco museum of science, art, and human perception that believes that curiosity and asking questions can lead to amazing moments of discovery, learning, awareness and understanding of how the world works. The Exploratorium creates tools and experiences that help visitors to become active explorers: hundreds of explore-for-yourself exhibits; a website with over 25,000 pages of content; film screenings; workshops for lifelong learners including day camps for kids and family investigations; and evening art and science events for adults. They also create professional development programs for educators, and are at the forefront of changing the way science is taught. The Exploratorium shares its exhibits and expertise with museums worldwide.

Bay As It Is Symposium
Habitat–the Bay as it is, or as it could be… Symposium will bring together an interdisciplinary group of thinkers in science, art, design, education, history, ecology, policy, legislation, and activism to help envision a resilient future for the Bay Area. The project is an outgrowth of the Bay Observatory Urban Fellow program and is envisioned as a public think-tank to bring professionals, non-professionals and educators together to consider the San Francisco Bay as habitat for future generations. The three-day symposium will consist of talks, excursions, design and working groups, and public events led by experts in various disciplines.

Since the Gold Rush, the ecology of San Francisco Bay has been radically transformed by human intention and action. Now it faces equally significant forces for change because of sea level rise, global warming and climate change. The Symposium will seek to understand what the last century and a half have meant for the Bay as habitat for flora, fauna and people and to think collectively about what might come next. Over the course of three days, a range of experts and citizens with special insight about the Bay landscape will convene to talk about the Bay’s habitat as it is now and to consider ways in which it might evolve over the next twenty to fifty years — and what that will likely mean for policy, design and daily life.

Urban Fellowship
The Exploratorium’s new Urban Fellow program will address issues related to climate change and rising sea levels.  This program situates an artist or urban practitioner in a residency within the Bay Observatory to explore the human relationship to the urban environment.  Fellows could explore concrete forms: such as architecture and infrastructure: as well as human forms: such as approaches to planning or individual practices within the city.  This investigation is both important and timely as urban areas globally explore the issue of climate change and coastal resiliency.

Jane Wolf, Bay Lexicon
Bay Lexicon is an illustrated field guide to San Francisco’s shoreline. Using methods and tools from landscape scholarship, design, and science education, Bay Lexicon aims to encourage observation and enquiry about the natural world and its relation to culture.

Living Innovation Zone
The LIZ project is a place making project, which encourages people to engage with their environment and each other in new and surprising ways.  The Exploratorium relies on this kind of open-ended inquiry as a means of engaging people and encouraging them to learn about themselves and the world around them.

Capital Campaign
It is the Exploratorium’s goal to be the world’s first net zero energy, carbon neutral museum.  Their LEED Platinum certification sets the stage as they continue to work on their sustainability goals.  The new location on San Francisco’s waterfront showcases a premiere “green” building, operating with maximum energy efficiency and preservation of the atmosphere.

exploratorium.edu

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Mission Community Market – Mercado Plaza

Posted by on May 25 2011 | 2011, Architecture, Grantees, Grantees by Category, Grantees by Year

Mission Community Market
2011 – $10,000 Mercado Plaza

Rebar and the Mission Community Market (MCM) have formed a partnership to create a new car-free plaza and public space on Bartlett Street in the Mission. Building on the place-making efforts of the MCM, the new plaza will provide a beautiful, safe and much needed public space for activities that support family health, promote small businesses and bring diverse communities together.Building on the MCM’s place-making activities, the Mercado Plaza will bring diverse communities together through the civic design process, entrepreneurial opportunity and public space design. The goal for the car-free plaza is to create a true public marketplace and flexible urban space. It will accommodate large gatherings, like MCM, as well as smaller neighborhood activities and play. The concept is a programmable plaza surface with temporary infrastructure such as market stall supports, shading, seating and a stage. Flexible street furniture, vendor stalls and utility hookups can reduce the barriers for diverse entrepreneurs to enter the marketplace as well as an upgrade to the ecological infrastructure of the street by implementing stormwater best management practices – permeable pavers, rain gardens and potentially subsurface infiltration. Unique paving, safer lighting, and a Mission mural arts gallery that has already begun on Bartlett will attract local shoppers, tourists and neighborhood families.

missioncommunitymarket.org

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Livable City

Posted by on May 25 2011 | 2011, 2012, 2013, Architecture, Grantees, Grantees by Year

Livable City
2013 – $10,000 Play Streets for All
2012 – $5,000 Permanent Sunday Streets Route in the Mission
2011 – $5,000 Permanent Sunday Streets Route in the Mission

Livable City is a sustainable transportation and land use advocacy non-profit in San Francisco that works to create a city of great streets and complete neighborhoods, where walking, bicycling, and transit are the best choices for most trips, and where public spaces are beautiful, well designed and maintained. They use an integrated approach to define livability that includes transportation and land use advocacy, development of policies for public space and best practices with a goal of creating a safer, healthier and more livable San Francisco.In 2008, Livable City partnered with the Mayor’s office and the Department of Public Health to produce San Francisco’s first two Sunday Streets events, which created several miles of car-free space for walking, cycling, jogging and organized recreational activities. Sunday Streets proved to be a huge success, and the program grew to six events in 2009 and nine events in both 2010 and 2011. Sunday Streets has provided recreational opportunities to tens of thousands of San Franciscans and visitors, focusing on neighborhoods that lack these opportunities. Benefits include local economic development, neighborhood commercial vitality, community building and neighborhood engagement, and a catalyst for neighborhood conversations about reclaiming streets on a temporary or permanent basis.Play Streets for All
Play Streets for All (PSFA) trains and supports local organizers to produce smaller open streets events – called Play Streets – in their communities. The idea behind this effort is to build local leadership and increase the number, location and frequency of car-free events in San Francisco.  PSFA program objectives are to (1) simplify the permit application process, (2) identify, contact and train PSFA organizers, (3) provide technical assistance to PSFA organizers during the event organizing process and (4) create a replicable PSFA organizing model that can be shared throughout the Bay Area.

livablecity.org
sundaystreetssf.com

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Story of Stuff Project/Annie Leonard

Posted by on May 18 2011 | 2011, Art, Ecology, Education, Grantees, Grantees by Year

Story of Stuff Project/Annie Leonard

2011 – $3,000 General Support

The Story of Stuff is a twenty minute animation on the way we make, use and throw away consumer goods.  With over 15 million views and counting, The Story of Stuff,  is one of the most watched environmental-themed online movies of all time.

The Story of Stuff Project was created by Annie Leonard to leverage and extend the film’s impact. It works to amplify public discourse on a series of environmental, social and economic concerns and facilitate the growing Story of Stuff community’s involvement in strategic efforts to build a more sustainable and just world. Their on-line community includes over 150,000 activists and they partner with hundreds of environmental and social justice organizations worldwide to create and distribute their films, curricula and other content.  Their latest movie, The Story of Change, has just been released.

storyofstuff.org

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