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Archive for the '2009' Category

Ted Purves and Suzanne Cockrell

Posted by on Jun 01 2009 | 2009, Art, Ecology, Grantees, Grantees by Year

Ted Purves and Suzanne Cockrell
2009 – $1,750 The Meadow Network Newspaper

The Meadow Network project, which was started in 2009, is rooted in a broad series of interviews with city residents from diverse backgrounds. What traditions of growing, preserving, festival and bartering do they hold on to? How would they see these as manifesting in the cities that they reside in and their everyday life? What would future urban green space come to resemble? The interviews were conducted at city farms, open markets, gardening stores and public parks.

The interviews accompanied by photographs, drawings and maps have been compiled into free newspapers. Three issues have been completed to date, and two more issues are currently in planning.

PDF versions of the newspapers can be downloaded at
http://fieldfaring.wordpress.com/the-meadow-network/

Susanne Cockrell and Ted Purves work collaboratively under the rubric of fieldfaring to create social art projects that investigate the overlay of urban and rural systems upon the lives of specific communities. They ask questions about the nature of people and place as seen through social economy, history and local ecology. The collaboration began with a two and a half year public project (2004-2007), Temescal Amity Works, which facilitated and documented the exchange of backyard produce, conversation, and collective biography within the Temescal Neighborhood of Oakland, CA.

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Novella Carpenter

Posted by on May 31 2009 | 2009, Ecology, Education, Fellows, Grantees by Year


Novella Carpenter
2009 Fellow

Novella Carpenter is an urban farmer, author, and biofuel champion. Her work has appeared on Salon.com, Sfgate.com, and Food and Wine magazine.  She is the author of Farm City: The Education of an Urban Farmer (Penguin, 2010). Farm City tells the story of her urban farm in Oakland, California where for more than ten years, Carpenter has been raising and living off of her own rabbits, chickens, bees, fruits, and vegetables. She also co-authored The Essential Urban Farmer (Penquin, 2010) with City Slicker Farms founder, Willow Rosenthal.

ghosttownfarm.wordpress.com

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Kelly Coyne and Erik Knutzen

Posted by on May 31 2009 | 2009, Ecology, Education, Fellows, Grantees by Year

Kelly Coyne and Erik Knutzen
2009 Fellows

Kelly Coyne and Erik Knutzen are the authors of The Urban Homestead: Your Guide to Self-Sufficient Living in the Heart of the City and Making It: Radical Home Ec for a Post-Consumer World. They founded the blog rootsimple.com in 2006.

They live in the heart of Los Angeles, in a bungalow set on a 1/2 acre lot where almost all of their land is devoted to growing edible or otherwise useful plants and trees. Their obsessions include bees, bikes, beer, chickens, dogs, healthy cities, healing herbs, simple living and good food.

rootsimple.com

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Laura Lawson

Posted by on May 31 2009 | 2009, Ecology, Education, Fellows, Grantees by Year

Laura Lawson
2009 Fellow

Laura Lawson is an acclaimed author, landscape architect and avid gardener. Currently she is the Chair for the Landscape Architecture Department at Rutgers University.  She has been documenting and writing about community gardens for over fifteen years and has produced several articles and two books –  City Bountiful: A History of Community Gardening in America (University of California Press, 2005) and Greening Cities, Growing Communities: Learning from Seattle’s Urban Community Gardens (co-authored with Jeff Hou and Julie Johnson, University of Washington Press, 2009).Lawson continues her documentation of urban gardens, focusing on the cities of Chicago, Detroit, New York, and San Francisco. Her intense background research on the historic evolution of each city developed into a comparative framework to identify key themes/issues to compare across the different cities.

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Iain Boal

Posted by on May 31 2009 | 2009, Education, Fellows, Grantees by Year

Iain Boal
2009 Fellow

Iain Boal is a social historian of science and technics, affiliated with the University of California and Birkbeck College, London. Boal is one of the founders of the Retort collective, an association of radical writers, teachers, artists, and activists, which has existed in the San Francisco Bay Area for the past two decades, with whom he co-authored Afflicted Powers: Capital and Spectacle in a New Age of War along.He is co-editor of Resisting the Virtual Life: The Culture and Politics of Information and author of The Green Machine, A history of the Bicycle.  His forthcoming book The Long Theft: Episodes in the History of Enclosure, traces key episodes in the history of ’enclosure’ – the fencing off, literally and figuratively, of the world’s commoners from their means of livelihood.  In 2005/6 he was a Guggenheim Fellow in Science and Technology.

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Gray Brechin

Posted by on May 31 2009 | 2009, Architecture, Fellows, Grantees by Year


Gray Brechin
2009 Fellow

Dr. Gray Brechin is an historical geographer and author whose chief interests are the state of California, the environmental impact of cities upon their hinterlands, and the invisible landscape of New Deal public works.

He is currently a visiting scholar in the U.C. Berkeley Department of Geography and founder and project scholar of California’s Living New Deal Project. California’s Living New Deal Project is an unprecedented collective effort to inventory and interpret the impact of New Deal public works projects on the Golden State. They invite informants to contribute information and photographs to map the vast matrix of public buildings, parks, and infrastructure Californians have come to take for granted. Through this archaeological dig into California’s lost history, they reveal an indispensable but invisible landscape while laying the groundwork for a national inventory.

graybrechin.net

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Chris Carlsson

Posted by on May 31 2009 | 2009, Education, Fellows, Grantees by Year

 

Chris Carlsson
2009 Fellow

Chris Carlsson is a writer, San Francisco historian, bicyclist, tour guide, blogger, photographer, book and magazine editor.  He is the author of Nowtopia and After the Deluge: A Novel of Post-Economic San Francisco. He edited Ten Years that Shook the City: San Francisco 1968-78 and Critical Mass: Bicycling’s Defiant Celebration.  Carlsson is one of the “founders” of Critical Mass, a mass bicycle ride that takes place the last Friday of every month in cities around the world.

Since the mid 1990’s Carlsson has directed the non-profit-project Shaping San Francisco, which has put together an online archive of local history, foundSF.org.

chriscarlsson.com

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Guerrero Park

Posted by on May 25 2009 | 2009, Architecture, Grantees, Grantees by Category, Grantees by Year

Guerrero Park
2009 – $8,000 General Support

San Jose Avenue, previously a one-way northbound street, was closed at its intersection with Guerrero Street and is now a two-way “cue street,” providing local access to residents along the block. The design of the resulting space was developed by Jane Martin of Shift Design Studio who provided her services free of charge to the City.

Raised planters, made of reclaimed logs from Golden Gate Park and featuring native and drought tolerant plants have been placed along the edge of the plaza facing Guerrero Street, creating a comfortable place for relaxation, contemplation and more active uses. Reclaimed segments of stainless steel ducting are filled with soil and plants in order to further demarcate the plaza space from the adjoining vehicular roadways. The soil used at this site is made in San Francisco by combining landscape clippings from parks and horse manure from the Police Department’s stables. Café tables and chairs are brought out in the morning and taken in at night. Future plans for the plaza include a children’s play structure.

sfpavementtoparks.sfplanning.org/index.htm

photo credit: Lucy Goodhart

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Urban Tilth

Posted by on May 24 2009 | 2009, Ecology, Education, Grantees, Grantees by Category, Grantees by Year


Urban Tilth
2009 – $5,000 General Support

Urban Tilth cultivates agriculture in West Contra Costa County to help the community build a more sustainable, healthy and just food system. Working with schools, community-based organizations, government agencies, businesses, and individuals, Urban Tilth aims to develop the capacity to produce 5% of Contra Costa County’s own food supply.

Operating on the belief that environmental restoration is inextricably connected to economic and social restoration, they are committed to training and employing local people, working collaboratively within community, establishing cross sector coalitions, engaging in local policy decisions and growing food locally and organically using the principles of permaculture to take into consideration waste reduction as well as water and soil conservation, preservation and restoration.

urbantilth.org

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Rebar

Posted by on May 24 2009 | 2009, 2013, Architecture, Art, Ecology, Education, Grantees, Grantees by Category, Grantees by Year

Rebar
2013 – $5,000 Adaptive Metropolis Symposium
2009 – $10,000 Hayes Valley Farm

REBAR’s work encompasses visual and conceptual public art, landscape design, urban intervention, temporary performance installation, digital media and print design. Together with UC Berkeley Department of Landscape Architecture, The Adaptive Metropolis symposium convenes a global community of thinkers and doers to discuss the future of user-generated urbanism. The participation of leading scholars and critics allows authoritative and thorough analysis. The symposium also provides practitioners and theorists with a platform to discuss and share ideas, experiences, knowledge, and skills, creating an up-to-date battlefield map. Lastly, the symposium explores new ways to look at the subject matter, setting the stage for the next phase of its development. http://laep.ced.berkeley.edu/adaptivemetropolis/site/

Hayes Valley Farm (HVF) is a temporary urban permaculture demonstration site in San Francisco. It is a 2.2-acre non-profit community-run farm, urban agriculture education and research project located in the heart of the city of San Francisco.  After the Loma Prieta earthquake in 1989, San Francisco’s Central Freeway was compromised and in the years to come the ramps bordered by Laguna, Oak, Fell, and Octavia Streets were closed, and the lot locked up. In January 2010, the City activated the site for temporary green space use, allowing for Hayes Valley Farm to create the space for education and reflection.

Rebar was part of the original team that conceived of, planned, and fundraised to create Hayes Valley Farm. They worked closely with the Mayor’s Office of San Francisco, The Hayes Valley Neighborhood Association, the Public Utilities Commission, and the Department of Public Works to open the gates to the formerly vacant lot and bring in essential infrastructure. Rebar partnered with S12 Architects in the design and construction of the farm’s greenhouse, and worked closely with the HVF team to develop the farm’s current logo.

Rebar is a cross-disciplinary practice for solving the design problems of the commons.

rebargroup.org
hayesvalleyfarm.com

photo credit: Lucy Goodhart 

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